Here are all our highlights from London Fashion week day 4.

Marques’Almeida
The past few months, the industry has been dominated by accusations of sexual assault and brave women have taken a stand, speaking out to cause change. For autumn/winter 18, Marques’Almeida have honoured these powerful women with the modern day ‘power dressing’. The soundtrack set the mood for the show, with SZA’s ‘Supermodel’ singing Why can’t I be alone all by myself? and Wish I was comfortable just with myself’.

Photography Nick DeLieto with thanks to Dazed

The message of the show was immediate, with a model walking out in an oversized white turtleneck jumper with the words ‘Power Women’ emblazoned across the front in marker. Other pieces read ‘Open your own doors’, ‘Truth and Beauty’ and ‘Live your life’. These pieces were paired with biker jackets and leather racing pants to form a contemporary state of power dressing.

The collections hard edge and powerful message were amplified with the designer’s abilities, juxtaposing a floaty shirt dress with a black snakeskin bum bag, or an A-line skirt with trousers paired with a cropped black bomber with a button on nylon extension. All of these elements played with the idea of femininity and bravery, showing that women can be what they want, do what they want and live how they want, just as well as men.

Dilara Findikoglu autumn/winter 18

Dilara Findikoglu
In a similar spirit to Marques’Almeida, Dilara Findikoglu created a new world called ‘Dilaratopia’ during London Fashion Week. A world where the celestial beings of women are impervious to the powers of men, a world that does not abide by the matrix of power or the patriarchy of society. The Dilaratopia Manifesto states “Escaping a world of Trumps and Weinsteins, here our lives belong to us, and us only”.

This ethos ran through the very veins of the latest collection, from the pieces all the way to the seating plan, which was on a first come first serve system, going against the hierarchy of fashion. Dilara set out to adorn the celestial spirits of ‘Dilaratopia’ for her autumn/winter 18 collection. Dilara’s celestial beings were decorated with cosmic metallics, electric blues and Mars reds. Headpieces looked like they were taken from the heads of Goddesses and the final look appeared to be taken off the back of Venus.

The Dilaratopia Manifesto says that “Celestial women are evidence that supreme moments of erotic meaning take place in the absence of the patriarchy we now laugh at”. This was evident in this collection, with ‘Dilaratopians’ sporting BDSM bondage straps and mesh tops revealing the ‘Dilaratopians’ breasts. The collection had a powerful message, in an age where women are being repressed, Dilara says women are impervious to the powers of the authoritarians in society, they are powerful beings who abide by their own rules and not those of the patriarchy.

Nicopanda with thanks to 10 magazine

Nicopanda
For the latest instalment in the Nicopanda story, Nicola Formichetti has combined the forces of Nirvana and Lil Kim for a fusion of Seattle 90s grunge and East Coast hip-hop for his latest collection, Smells like Queens Spirit. This fusion had conjured a new form of empowerment, with the hard edge of grunge and the sexual liberation of hip-hop. The most evident manifestation of this fusion is the interpretation of the Nirvana logo in the Nicopanda branding and the 90s Hip Hop label Tommy Boy Records logo sported on the backs of jackets and the side of pants.

The grunge elements came in the form of buffalo check plaids which were paired with the Nicopanda/Nirvana logo emblazoned hoodies, trousers and t-shirts. Oversized thrift store silhouettes ran throughout the show with longline fluorescent faux fur coats and a series of highlighter coloured oversized puffer coats. Hip Hop influences were weaved into the grunge elements with Nicoboy emblazoned track pantsuits, huge branded gold chains and plaid bucket hats.

The two elements, although polar opposites, were married together in perfect anarchy. The collections hard edge was also paired with the queer nature that Nicopanda is known for. The soundtrack was a medley of queer mashup hits such as Britney Spears remixed with Nirvana. The pieces carried the same message, with boldly coloured beanies reading ‘QUEER’ and drag queen Aquaria strutting down the runway in a longline highlighter pink faux fur coat and matching hat. As the sound of RuPaul saying “bring back my girls” for the finale sounded, the collection all came together, the elements which all opposed each other, fitted together like the plaid patchwork featured throughout the collection.